Understanding Soccer’s Three Basic Passes

Understanding Soccer’s Three Basic Passes

There are three basic passes in the game of soccer – striker, square, and reverse.
The forward pass is the most aggressive and dangerous of the three because the attacking team moves the ball towards the goal. The length of the pass, where you are trying to take it, and the skills of the passer and receiver are all factors that increase your chances of intercepting the pass.
A square lane is a relatively safe lane. Try to make this pass when you are trying to get out of a difficult situation – for example, two opponents are preparing for you. In this case, you need to give the ball to an open teammate or to better pitches with the ball.
The back pass is the most conservative of all the passes. Use this pass to get out of a difficult defensive situation – for example, when you have little space or no room to pass the ball forward or you need to give your team a chance to regroup. However, if you are not careful, you may run into problems. When passing to a goalkeeper or another teammate, you have to remember where the enemy is because the opponent may run out of nowhere and steal or intercept the pass.

Many back passes are converted into goals – as in the case of a player who scores against him. (This is perhaps the most embarrassing of all the plays in football.) You can solve most back-pass and special-goal problems with proper contact and positioning, although the luck factor is always involved.